GUERIN JOINS LIST FOR GOAL IN ONE GOLF CLASSIC


United States Hockey Hall of Fame member, Stanley Cup champion and Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Penguins general manager Bill Guerin has joined the roster for the team’s GOAL IN ONE Golf Tournament, presented by GWC Warranty.

Guerin joins an impressive lineup of Wilkes-Barre/Scranton alumni, including the Pittsburgh Penguins’ two-time Stanley Cup winning coach Mike Sullivan; current New Jersey Devils head coach John Hynes; Devils assistant Alain Nasreddine; and Glenn Patrick, who guided the Penguins during the team’s first four seasons in the American Hockey League.  Former Penguins players Dennis Bonvie and Chris Kelleher will be on hand, as will current Wilkes-Barre/Scranton coaches Clark Donatelli, Chris Taylor and J.D. Forrest.

The two-day event will feature a VIP reception at the Westmoreland Club on Sunday, July 16, followed by the 18-hole, captain and crew format tournament at Blue Ridge Trail Golf Club on Monday, July 17.  Golfers will be treated to continental breakfast, lunch on the course, hors d’oeuvres and a pig roast dinner, as well as an open bar during the meal, and a special gift for each participant.

More names will be added to the lineup in the near future.

Proceeds from the event will benefit the Penguins GOALS Foundation, which provides young people and families with the opportunity to experience the game of hockey firsthand, as well as the Blue Chip Farm Animal Refuge in Dallas, PA.

Registration for the Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Penguins GOAL IN ONE Golf Tournament, presented by GWC Warranty, is $1000.00 per foursome.  Spots are extremely limited.  To reserve your team’s spot in the tournament, contact the Penguins at 570-208-5425, or email Shari Zbegner at szbegner@wbspenguins.com for more information.

2017-18 Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Penguins Season Ticket Information

MIKE SULLIVAN TOPS GUEST LIST AT GOAL IN ONE GOLF TOURNAMENT


Stanley Cup winning head coach Mike Sullivan will headline a stellar group of guests at the 2017 Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Penguins GOAL IN ONE Golf Tournament, presented by GWC Warranty.

The two-day event will feature a VIP reception at the Westmoreland Club on Sunday, July 16, followed by the 18-hole, captain and crew format tournament at Blue Ridge Trail Golf Club on Monday, July 17. Golfers will be treated to continental breakfast, lunch on the course, hors d’oeuvres and a pig roast dinner, as well as an open bar during the meal, and a special gift for each participant.



In addition to Sullivan, who spent part of the 2015-16 season behind the Wilkes-Barre/Scranton bench and has guided the Pittsburgh Penguins to the Stanley Cup Final for the second consecutive season, the tournament will feature several other current and former Wilkes-Barre/Scranton coaches.

Current New Jersey Devils head coach John Hynes, as well as Devils assistant Alain Nasreddine, will be on hand, as will Glenn Patrick, who guided the team during its first four seasons. Current Wilkes-Barre/Scranton coaches Clark Donatelli, Chris Taylor and J.D. Forrest, will participate as well.

More names will be added to the lineup in the near future.

Proceeds from the event will benefit the Penguins GOALS Foundation, which provides young people and families with the opportunity to experience the game of hockey firsthand, as well as the Blue Chip Farm Animal Refuge in Dallas, PA.

Registration for the Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Penguins GOAL IN ONE Golf Tournament, presented by GWC Warranty, is $1000.00 per foursome, and is open now. To reserve your team’s spot in the tournament, contact the Penguins at 570-208-5425, or email Shari Zbegner at szbegner@wbspenguins.com for more information.

SIX EYES ARE BETTER THAN FOUR

For the first time in Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Penguins history, a head coach will be flanked by two assistants on the bench.

Clark Donatelli will be joined on the bench during the season by new assistant coaches Chris Taylor and J.D. Forrest. Both men have been active in individual instruction with players through the early goings of Penguins training camp. Day two of camp saw Taylor and Forrest take the reins on several drills, as well, so that Donatelli could work with a different sect of players elsewhere on the ice.

The three-man coaching unit already appears to be meshing quite well, and the same could be said for Forrest’s move to Northeastern Pennsylvania.

Forrest rolled into Wilkes-Barre for the first time in early August to scout the area and has had a smooth adjustment to his family’s new home ever since.

“This is a nice area, we like our spot,” Forrest said. “School’s been awesome, the kids are adjusting well. The organization makes it really easy.”

Forrest makes a point to mention school, because as a father of a six-year-old daughter who only knew a European education system during Forrest’s days coaching in Austria, he and his wife Sarah weren’t sure how she would handle the whirlwind of changes.

“My oldest, Madison, she’s going to an American school for the first time,” Forrest said. “We were a little worried about that, but it’s been smooth. The whole thing’s been great.”

On the other hand, Taylor has been all go, go, go in terms of work and hasn’t had much time to hit the brakes and explore Northeastern Pennsylvania.

“No, not really” Taylor said with a smile. “My biggest concern so far has been getting comfortable at the rink, getting to know everybody from the players to the office staff. We’re trying to get everything organized with our video, practices, and just making sure we’re on top of our game.”

In fact, Taylor has been grinding away in the coaches’ office so much, he hasn’t even had the opportunity for anyone to show him around for some good eats. He is completely clueless when it comes to all things NEPA right now.

“I haven’t been out on the town yet,” Taylor said. “Hopefully, I will soon.”

Somebody get this man some Old Forge pizza, stat.

Taylor and the rest of the coaching staff’s preparation has led to high-paced practices that has had the players at Penguins training camp sweating bullets as they try and shed the rust from the off-season. Seeing the intensity of the practices has brought back fond memories of Forrest’s playing days, but with an added bonus.

“It’s exciting at first,” Forrest said. “Getting back on the ice and getting that feeling, it’s not too different from being a player, except now I don’t have to worry about being in such great shape.”